Friday, December 16, 2011

Sloe gin





































Frost and snow lately has finally softened the sloes on blackthorns in Teesdale and Weardale and there's a real temptation to taste a ripe one - a temptation to be resisted. I did once - and only once - and it was so breathtakingly sour that I'll never do it again. There's only one way to consume these - as sloe gin, marinaded in gin and sugar for a few months. 

10 comments:

  1. Probably the very best way for us to enjoy them Phil; or leave them for the birds lol

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  2. It's said that it's better to make sloe gin after a frost, but beware I once waited and had them cleared by newly arrived and hungry fieldfares!

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  3. I experienced similar shock tasting a Sea Buckthorn berry. Once is enough!

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  4. I too made the same mistake. It even put me off Sloe Gin!

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  5. Just about toffeeaple - I meant to make some damson gin (which I prefer) for Christmas but forgot this year

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  6. Hi Keith, even the birds seem to eat them only as a last resort!

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  7. Hi watty, I've noticed they do tend with wither quite quickly once they've been frosted....

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  8. Never tasted a sea buckthorn berry Rob but now you've warned me I won't be tempted!

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  9. They leave an incredibly dry taste on your mouth, don't they Adrian...? Sloe gin does have a lovely colour..

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