Monday, May 4, 2015

Common sandpiper


Everyone welcomes the arrival of summer migrants - swallows, cuckoos, warblers - but common sandpipers are barely noticed, which is a pity because they are such a charming feature of our northern riverbanks.





















They may be common and their plumage colours are muted but they are delightful little waders. This one was feeding on the margin of Tunstall reservoir, near Wolsingham in Weardale.

















When they're not feeding along the water margin they tend to perch on boulders on the edge and bob up and down - behaviour known as 'teetering'. I usually don't spot them until they fly, with those distinctive fast, shallow wing beats and three-note alarm call.


10 comments:

  1. I too like these but they always see me before I see them.

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    1. I looked over the wall and there it was - lucky!

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  2. Never seen one at all. I am jealous.

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    1. Always look forward to seeing and hearing them along the upper reaches of the rivers Wear and Tees in summer

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  3. Lovely. Not seen them before (or maybe I have and not known it).

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    1. easy to miss - their colour scheme hides them well

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Amazing how common experience can cross continents!

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  5. I have seen the sandpipers oor their relatives near Mumbai. Their colour gives them protection from stray dogs.

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    1. They seem to be a species with a very wide geographical range!

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