Thursday, November 20, 2014

Fine fungi

After a bit of a slow start here, the crop of interesting autumn fungi is beginning to improve, no doubt because of recent rain. We found these three species in the Tyne valley near Wylam today. 
























Variable oysterling Crepidotus variabilis, growing on dead gorse stem





















Beech woodwort Hypoxylon fragiforme, looking very like Christmas baubles. Growing on a fallen tree trunk.



















Purple jellydisc Ascocoryne sarcoides, looking like something that belongs on a butcher's slab. Growing on a fallen tree trunk.


8 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Linda, for the comment and for visiting

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  2. These are excellent. It hasn't been a good fungi season but there is still time.

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    Replies
    1. This mild, wet, foggy weather seems to encourage them

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  3. Fabulous images. I never see many where my creamcrackerednature blog runs to, as I tend not to run through much woodland. Shaggy ink caps punching through people's driveways the most common things I see.

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    1. Shaggy ink cap is a lovely toadstool - seems to like to colonise disturbed soil. Often see it on road verges after road works.

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  4. Great photos, been out in the park to day and still very few fungi about..
    Amanda xx

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    1. Some of them are very short-lived, here-today-gone-tomorrow, especially the more delicate species that grow in grass.

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