Monday, February 1, 2016

Tree silhouettes in winter

Every autumn, as the last leaf falls, I've had good intentions of recording a set of images of the characteristic silhouettes of different tree species in winter. They are all distinctive and beautiful in their various ways.

This winter I finally made a start but I hadn't bargained on how difficult it would be to find good isolated examples of trees silhouetted again a clear sky background, so progress has been slow. Anyway, here are a few, that I hope to add to before bud burst begins in a few weeks' time.  



Sycamore Acer pseudoplatanus. Only the tree on the left has had enough space to develop symmetrical growth; the two on the right have got in each other's way.



Horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum. Those almost horizontal heavy lower limbs are characteristic; in the rare absence of grazing animals they'll sweep almost down to the ground and are usually the first to be shed from old trees in gales.


Ash Fraxinus excelsior. The upward sweep of the rather thick twigs is characteristic.





















Durmast oak Quercus petraea

14 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Must try and get a few more before spring arrives!

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  2. Replies
    1. They're often at their best at sunrise or sunset - poetic times of day

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  3. Replies
    1. Constantly scanning the horizon for silhouettes now

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  4. Each tree silhouette is beautiful.The sycamores look as though they are talking with each other.Perhaps they are too:)

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    1. Perhaps they are communicating underground, via shared fungal networks!

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  5. Thaank you for this, I will find it very useful.

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  6. There is something of a timeless grace to winter trees in silhouette. Added to by jackdaws and rooks at roost in the evening.

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    1. I know exactly what you mean. Tree silhouettes against a late winter sunset with flocks of birds is one of those sights that stirs the emotions; ennui combined with optimism that spring isn't far away now.

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  7. A super idea, beautifully executed, Phil! This is going to sound crazy, but (to me) the Sycamores look cheerful, the Horse Chestnut looks sad, and (what is even more weird) the Ash reminded me of Ken Dodd - even before I'd read what it was!!

    Must go and answer the door to the men in white coats - best wishes - - - Richard

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    Replies
    1. I'll never look at those trees in quite the same way again, Richard! All the best, Phil

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