Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Northumbrian coastal flora

The coastal flora was particularly beautiful during our stay in Northumberland in early July. These are some of the highlights.




































Pyramidal orchids on the sand dunes at Embleton.



































Agrimony on the coastal path south of Howick.



































Bloody cranesbill (above and below) at Low Newton.




































Common mallow on the coastal path between Low Newton and Football Hole.


















Hawkweeds and quaking grass at Football Hole




































Lady's bedstraw at Low Newton.
























Meadow cranesbill growing close to the beach at Howick (typically crowded Northumbrian beach!) and ..























..... just above the high water mark at Low Newton




































A magnificent display of ragged robin on the coastal path south of Howick.



















Rest harrow at Low Newton.















Sea mayweed at Budle Bay (top) and on the black dolerite boulders at Dunstanburgh.






















Sea pink at Cullernose Point (top) and at Dunstanburgh (above).



































Silverweed (showing silvery underside leaves) on the shingle at Budle Bay























Wild carrot at Low Newton






















White stonecrop and ....


















.... yellow stonecrop, both at Budle Bay


3 comments:

  1. A very nice selection of images there Phil.
    Three or four yeas ago I decided my botanical knowledge was so limited that I ought to do something about it. I did learn quite a bit and found it all very interesting. I do have the problem of forgetting the names of plants.:-) Cheers. Brian.

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  2. My memory for names isn't what it was Brian. Every year I tell myself I'll get to grips with a particularly tricky group of plants, like grasses for example, but somehow never do. I've recently come across a very good photoguide to wild flowers called Harrap's Wild Flowers which is very useful for plant ID.

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  3. Many people had told me about the beauty of the English wildflowers. Thanks for sharing. Our wildflowers are hardly to be seen now due to the rapid expansion of my city.

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