Wednesday, June 13, 2012

However did I manage to miss this ........... ?





For the last 30 years, when we've been walking along the river Tees at Egglestone we've parked within 20 metres of the spot where this Jacob's ladder Polemonium caeruleum grows but it was only a couple of days ago that I actually noticed it for the first time. I guess it must have been the first time we'd parked there when the plant was in full flower.


































It's a rare native species and this was probably a garden escape, but very attractive nonetheless.


































There were a few dozen plants in the population, including this white flowered, fasciated plant.

11 comments:

  1. A dainty and very attractive flower, Phil.

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  2. It's a skill. If you ever need any tips on how to miss stuff, just get in touch. G

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  3. What a beauty! Good for us that you didn't miss it this time!

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  4. They are a beautiful plant Phil.

    Never seen a wild one before, but I used to have some cultivated ones in my garden years ago.

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  5. I used to have it in my garden Emma but it died out after a few years (as it does in the wild, apparently) ... but now I'm reacquainted with it will grow it again.

    I haven't managed to pin down precise names for your two white-flowered crucifers. According to Tim Rich's book on crucifers they both seem to be referable to the broad group of plants known as scurvy grass Cochlearia officinalis but the narrow-petalled one could be alpine scurvygrass C.pyrenaica subsp. alpina - but you need samples of the fruits and leaves to be sure.

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  6. I seem to be getting better (worse?) at it all the time Graeme, which is worrying....

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  7. I haven't seem it very often lotusleaf - the last time was in the Howgills in Cumbria - so it was a very pleasant surprise

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  8. It really like the combination of blue petals and yellow stamens petoskystone..

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  9. It always seem to turn up fairly close to houses Keith - this was about 300 metres from some old gardens .... something must carry the small seeds around

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  10. Hi Phil and thanks for the id advice. I sat for ages yesterday with my Francis Rose and pinned it down to Cochlearia officinallis, so I'm pleased that's what you think too. I'll put it down as that when I post the blog. My trouble is that I'm always so keen to take the picture that I forget to check all of the points to aid id.

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