Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Ladybird Spotting



A lot of bloggers have reported unusually large numbers of seven-spot ladybirds emerging after overwintering successfully and I don't think I've ever seen so many in my garden here in Co. Durham - even in high summer. It's certainly not a local phenomenon and when I had a look around a tiny back garden in Cleethorpes, in Lincolnshire, today I counted upwards of 20 on a single aphid-infested Euphorbia characias shrub .... plus an unusual interloper in their midst ..


... in the form of this beautifully marked eyed ladybird. 




































These are usually associated with conifers but when I looked around I couldn't see any conifers in this garden or any of the adjoining ones - so it must have been an accidental arrival, carried in from some distance away on the wind. Lovely little ladybird, though ...

8 comments:

  1. Er... well spotted, Phil.

    I saw some data recently from the Biological Record Centre that showed pre-Harlequin, some native species were increasing, some were decreasing. Post-Harlequin, all were very definitely decreasing.

    Here's hoping that the native species get a head start this year.

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  2. Literally hundreds of 7 spots around here plus one tiny 2 spot found. The eyed ladybird looks a beauty. Well 'spotted'.

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  3. Lovely pictures, thanks for sharing.

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  4. It's a similar story here except that I haven't noticed any that aren't seven spot.

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  5. Looks like they've got a good start Graeme - I found some harlequin ladybirds in Durham a couple of years ago but haven't seen any since ...

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  6. It's definitely my favourite ladybird John but I don't see very many...

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  7. Everyone's favourite beetle I guess, snippa..

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  8. I wonder how many there will be in summer, after a successful round of breeding, toffeeapple..

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